!DOCTYPE html> Achievements

RESEARCH Achievements

21

Researchers Reveal Colonic Crypt Receptor for Toxin B From Hypervirulent Clade 2 C. difficile

Recently, Liang Tao and his colleagues at Westlake University identified TFPI as a physiologically relevant receptor for Clostridioides difficile toxin B (TcdB) from the hypervirulent clade 2 lineages. The work, published in Cell on March 17, has filled a major knowledge gap in C. difficile infection pathogenesis.

VIEW ALL

16

Yigong Shi’s Lab Reports Cryo-EM Structure of Nuclear Ring from Nuclear Pore Complex

Recently, the Yigong Shi lab at Westlake University published an article online on Cell Research titled "Cryo-EM structure of the nuclear ring from Xenopus laevis nuclear pore complex". In this article, they reported the single-particle cryo-EM structure of the NR subunit from Xenopus laevis NPC with the highest resolution (5.6 Å) to date.

VIEW ALL

18

Soft-lock Drawing of Super-aligned Carbon Nanotube Bundles for Nanometer Electrical Contacts

Assembling single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into high-density horizontal arrays is strongly desired for practical applications, but challenges remain despite much research. We developed a nondestructive soft-lock drawing method to achieve ultraclean single-walled CNT arrays with a very high degree of alignment.

VIEW ALL

20

Urine as a Novel COVID-19 Severity Indicator

VIEW ALL

28

Recent development in Prof. Sergio Galindo-Torres' group, focusing on using numerical models to broaden our understanding on complex physical processes

VIEW ALL

15

School of Life Sciences PI Yilong Zou developed a new approach to stratify ferroptosis sensitivity in vitro and in situ

On November 22, Westlake Laboratory principal investigator Yilong Zou, in collaboration with principal investigator Stuart Schreiber of Broad Institute, presented their work in Cell Chemical Biology entitled “PALP: A rapid imaging technique for stratifying ferroptosis sensitivity in normal and tumor tissues in situ”.

VIEW ALL

30

Westlake-led Team Developed the World’s First Generalized Association Tool that Applies Applicable to Biobank-scale Data with Millions of Individuals

VIEW ALL

15

Team of Dr. Xing Chang Successfully Extended Lifespan of DMD mice Through Dystrophin Restoration Resulted from CRISPR- guided Exon Skipping

Built on their previously established gene editing system (TAM, aka CRISPR/dCas9-AID), a research group led by Dr. Xing Chang at Westlake University recently demonstrated that AAV-mediated systemic delivery of TAM could result in efficient exon skipping, substantial restoration of dystrophin (a protein lost in patients with DMD due to genetic mutations), correction of both cardiac and skeletal muscle defects, and extension of lifespan in a newly established DMD murine model.

VIEW ALL