NEWS & EVENTS Event Calendars Event

Time & Date

8:30-9:30 AM, Friday, Sep. 11, 2020

Venue

Broadcast via ZOOM (Meeting ID: 839 9741 6318)

Host

Audience

Faculty and Staff,Graduate Students,Undergraduate Students

Category

Academics and Research

80th Westlake Master Forum | Dariush Mozaffarian: Advances in Nutrition Science: New Priorities and Remaining Controversies

Time:8:30-9:30 AM, Friday, Sep. 11, 2020

Host: Ju-Sheng Zheng, Ph.D., PI of School of Life Sciences, Westlake University

Participation: Broadcast via ZOOM (Meeting ID: 839 9741 6318)




Speaker Dariush Mozaffarian, Dean and Jean Mayer Professor at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition, Science and Policy, Professor of Medicine at Tufts Medical School, USA


Dr. Mozaffarian received a BS in biological sciences at Stanford (Phi Beta Kappa), MD at Columbia (Alpha Omega Alpha), residency training in internal medicine at Stanford, and fellowship training in cardiovascular medicine at the University of Washington. He also received an MPH from the University of Washington and a Doctorate in Public Health from Harvard. Before being appointed as Dean at Tufts in 2014, Dr. Mozaffarian was at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health for a decade and clinically active in cardiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Dr. Mozaffarian’s research investigations span epidemiologic studies, evidence syntheses, clinical trials, national and global demography, and policy analyses and implementation. Dr. Mozaffarian has authored more than 400 scientific publications on dietary priorities for obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases, and on evidence-based policy approaches to reduce these burdens in the US and globally. He has served in numerous advisory roles including for the US and Canadian governments, American Heart Association, World Health Organization, and United Nations.


Title:

Advances in Nutrition Science: New Priorities and Remaining Controversies


Abstract:

A healthy diet is the foundation for prevention and treatment of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and many other conditions.  Overall, poor diet is a leading cause of global deaths.  At the same time, we face a global pandemic of obesity, diabetes, and related conditions, rising in recent decades due to social, cultural, and environmental changes transmitted primarily through our food system and other lifestyle habits. Familiarity with the evidence for effects of different dietary factors, including controversies and uncertainties, is essential to prioritize interventions to improve eating habits and reduce diet-related diseases. 

For most of the 20th century, research and policy focused on nutrient deficiency diseases (e.g., scurvy, pellagra) and increased agricultural production of inexpensive, shelf stable, starchy crops (e.g., rice, wheat, corn) to feed a rapidly growing world population.  These efforts were successful at achieving their goals, leading to a modern global food system that emphasizes commodity crops and shelf-stable, inexpensive packaged and processed foods rich in starch and sugar, preserved by salt, and fortified with vitamins.  This legacy food system was built to address caloric hunger and vitamin deficiencies, not diet-related chronic diseases.  It was not until the 1980s that modern nutrition science turned to focus more on chronic conditions like cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and obesity.

Over the last 40 years, the emerging science has rapidly advanced from less reliable types of studies to more robust evidence from prospective cohort studies of disease endpoints, well-conducted metabolic trials of diverse risk markers and pathways, and randomized clinical trials of disease endpoints. Several new conclusions have emerged. First, dietary habits influence not only blood cholesterol (a major focus of the 1980’s), but also multiple other established and emerging risk factors. Consequently, health effects of any dietary factor cannot be inferred from effects on any single biomarker. Second, specific foods and overall dietary patterns, rather than isolated single nutrients, are most important for cardiometabolic health. Third, obesity must be addressed through a focus on diet quality, rather than calories (energy balance). Fourth, insufficient intakes of protective foods produce similar or greater disease burdens than excess intakes of unhealthy factors. This talk will review this new evidence, and highlight key knowledge gaps.  Because translation of knowledge into action is essential, this talk also briefly reviews effective behavior change strategies.


Contact:

biguanying@westlake.edu.cn

Time & Date

8:30-9:30 AM, Friday, Sep. 11, 2020

Venue

Broadcast via ZOOM (Meeting ID: 839 9741 6318)

Host

Audience

Faculty and Staff,Graduate Students,Undergraduate Students

Category

Academics and Research