NEWS & EVENTS Event Calendars Event

Time & Date

2:00-3:30 PM, Wednesday, Oct 21, 2020

Venue

Lecture Hall, 1F, Building 5, Yunqi Campus

Host

Audience

Faculty and Staff,Graduate Students,Undergraduate Students

Category

Academics and Research

82nd Master Forum | Chunmiao Zheng:Fifty Years of Groundwater Contaminant Transport Modeling

Time:2:00-3:30 PM, Wednesday, Oct 21, 2020

Venue: Lecture Hall, 1F, Building 5, Yunqi Campus

Host: Ling Li, Chair Professor of School of Engineering, Westlake University



Speaker Chunmiao Zheng, Chair Professor and Founding Dean, School of Environmental Science and Engineering; Vice Provost of Global Strategies, Southern University of Science and Technology

 

Chunmiao Zheng is currently Chair Professor and Vice Provost of Global Strategies at Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) in Shenzhen, China. He joined SUSTech as Founding Dean of the School of Environmental Science and Engineering in 2015. Previously, he was Chair Professor and Director of the Institute of Water Sciences at Peking University in Beijing, China, and the George Lindahl III Endowed Professor at the University of Alabama. His research interests include groundwater contaminant transport and remediation, basin-scale ecohydrological processes, and water resource sustainability. He is developer of the MT3D/MT3DMS series of contaminant transport models used in over 100 countries, and author of over 300 peer-reviewed journal papers and 6 books, including the textbook Applied Contaminant Transport Modeling, with first and second editions published by Wiley. He has served as associate editor for five leading hydrology and water resource journals (Water Resources Research, Journal of Hydrology, Groundwater, Hydrogeology Journal, and Vadose Zone Journal). He has also served on the Committee on Hydrologic Science of the U.S. National Research Council and as president of the International Commission on Groundwater of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences. He has received numerous awards and honors, including the Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lectureship and O.E. Meinzer Award from the Geological Society of America, and the John Hem Award and M. King Hubbert Award from the National Ground Water Association. He is also recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award from the Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is a fellow of both American Geophysical Union and Geological Society of America. He holds a Ph.D. degree in geoscience with a minor in environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Title:

Fifty Years of Groundwater Contaminant Transport Modeling



Abstract:

Mathematical modeling and predictive assessment of contaminant transport in the subsurface is at the core of environmental water sciences. Yet modeling and predicting contaminant transport in the physically and chemically heterogeneous subsurface is exceedingly difficult and remains one of the unresolved grand challenges. This is because the predictive modeling requires highly resolved characterization of the subsurface heterogeneity, which is technically daunting and cost prohibitive. Over the last five decades, groundwater scientists have tried continuously and strenuously to develop and improve concepts, approaches, and techniques for field-scale contaminant transport modeling, with a few major surprises and paradigm shift moments along the way. This presentation will review the evolution and progress of contaminant transport modeling from the inception in the early 1970s to the state of the art in the present. In particular, the review will draw from field studies at well-instrumented tracer experiment sites that have provided invaluable insights and extensive data sets essential to development and testing of transport theories and mathematical models. One of the best known such tracer experiment sites is the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site. Since the early 1980s, field data from the MADE site have been used extensively by researchers around the world to explore complex contaminant transport phenomena in highly heterogeneous aquifers. The field campaigns at the MADE site over the past 35 years have revealed the dominant role of connected networks of small-scale preferential flow paths and relative flow barriers in controlling solute migration, spreading, and mixing processes, and the findings from the MADE site have inspired various theories and models to accommodate the so-called anomalous transport or non-Fickian transport observed in the field. The presentation will conclude with an outlook and perspective on the future challenges and opportunities of contaminant transport modeling research.

 

Contact:

biguanying@westlake.edu.cn




Time & Date

2:00-3:30 PM, Wednesday, Oct 21, 2020

Venue

Lecture Hall, 1F, Building 5, Yunqi Campus

Host

Audience

Faculty and Staff,Graduate Students,Undergraduate Students

Category

Academics and Research