NEWS & EVENTS Event Calendars Event

Time & Date

4:00-5:30 PM,Mon.,June 7,2021

Venue

Room 312, 3F, Building 3,  Yunqi Campus

Host

Dr. Kiryl D. Piatkevich, School of Life Sciences

Audience

Faculty and Staff,Graduate Students,Undergraduate Students

Category

Academics and Research

SLS Special Seminar | Yulong Li: Spying on neuromodulation by constructing new genetically-encoded fluorescent sensors

Time4:00-5:30 PM,Mon.,June 7,2021

Venue: Room 312, 3F, Building 3,  Yunqi Campus

Host:Dr. Kiryl D. Piatkevich, School of Life Sciences



Speaker:

Dr. Yulong Li

Professor at the School of Life Sciences of Peking University (PKU), PKU-THU Center for Life Sciences and PKU-IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research



Yulong Li is a professor at the School of Life Sciences of Peking University (PKU), PKU-THU Center for Life Sciences and PKU-IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research. He obtained his B.D. from PKU and Ph.D. from Duke Univ. He then conducted his postdoctoral research at Stanford Univ.

His group's research centers on "synapse", the fundamental unit for the communication between neurons. They carry two layers of research: first, they develop cutting edge research tools, namely advanced genetically-encoded imaging probes, to untangle the complexity of nervous system in space and in time; second, capitalizing on the advancement of research toolkits, they study the regulation of synaptic transmission, focusing on the modulation of various neuromodulator release. Recently, his group pioneered the development and application of new genetically-encoded fluorescent sensors, capable to detect the release of dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, and adenosine with high spatial and temporal resolution in physiological and pathological conditions. These works were recently published in Cell, Nature Biotechnology, Neuron, Nature Methods, and Science. His group currently are expanding this principle to develop sensors for the entire range of known neurotransmitters and neuromodulators.


Abstract:

Diverse neuromodulators in the brain, such as acetylcholine, monoamines, lipids and neuropeptides, play important roles in a plethora of physiological processes including reward, movement, attention, sleep, learning and memory. Dysfunction of the neuromodulatory system is associated with a range of diseases, such as epilepsy, addition, neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. A longstanding yet largely unmet goal is to measure the dynamics of different neuromodulators reliably and specifically with high spatiotemporal resolution, particularly in behaving animals. To achieve this goal, we develop a series of genetically encoded GPCR-activation-based (GRAB) sensors for the detection of acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, adenosine, ATP, serotonin, histamine, endocannabinoids and neuropeptides, and validate the performance of these sensors in multiple preparations in vitro and in vivo. The GRAB sensor toolbox provides new insights into the dynamics and mechanism of neuromodulatory signaling both in health and disease. The GRAB strategy is now being applied to develop new sensors for other important extracellular signaling molecules.


Contact:

Wenyue Yu:yuwenyue@westlake.edu.cn

School of Life Sciences


Time & Date

4:00-5:30 PM,Mon.,June 7,2021

Venue

Room 312, 3F, Building 3,  Yunqi Campus

Host

Dr. Kiryl D. Piatkevich, School of Life Sciences

Audience

Faculty and Staff,Graduate Students,Undergraduate Students

Category

Academics and Research